BGP: Why it is important for Women of Color to seek professional help regarding stress.

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Before I went away to college, I didn’t know what stress really was because I didn’t have a reason to be stressed. However, in my two and a half years of attending college I’ve found myself more stressed than ever.

My insecurities were written on my forehead, in my body language, even my skin. My insecurities were loud in my writing, in my vocabulary and in my relations.

To be young, black, a female and to deal with personal issues can take a toll on your soul.

This is a Black Girl Problem.

I don’t want to pretend and act as if I’ve discovered a method that would help young black women with their daily struggles. What I do want to acknowledge is there will be more struggles to come, and we shouldn’t dwell on the ones in front of us. We should actually embrace these struggles, for they mold us into the strong, independent, optimistic and most of all beautiful creatures we are.

However, the journey to embracing your struggles and dealing with stress in a healthy way can be difficult for the average human, and twice as hard for women of color.

Why you ask?

Well, women of color are already labeled with certain words which make it hard for us to express ourselves openly.

“Angry Black Woman”

“Ghetto”

“She’s strong, she’ll get over it”

These statements make it hard for women of color to reach out and seek professional help, because they feel as if no one would understand their anger or would even want to understand.

I believe it is very important for women of color to find professional help to explain all the complicated feelings one deals with on a daily basis. I also think it is important for young women of color to show the younger generation that there is no such thing as “Angry Black Woman.” That stereotype has misconstrued what women of color have gone through in their life.

We are people, we have emotions that need special attention when needed. Don’t be ashamed to seek out help that will benefit your growth.

You matter most.

 

 

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Dnysha Cook
Dnysha is a third year New England College student pursing a a Bachelor's Degree in Communications. She is a very active member of the NEC community whether she's hosting events, working as an RA, or organizing functions for Amazing Minority Girls Unite where she works as club President. She has been involved with The New Englander for several years as Social Media Editor and currently writes a column entitled, Black Girl Problems. Dnysha will be graduating in Spring 2019.

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